Open Letter To President ED Mnangagwa

Greetings Mr President!

Let me start by saying Congratulations on your appointment as the new president of the Republic of Zimbabwe.

It is said that, “uneasy lays the head that wears a crown’ so I know that as the President, you have a lot on your plate to accomplish as far as the development of Zimbabwe is concerned.

Definitely, you can’t do it all alone hence the need for the citizens of Zimbabwe (wherever we find ourselves) to put our heads and hands together to build our nation.

As you might be aware, nyika yese irikufara, or should i say “yakazipigwa” by your ascendancy to the country’s top post.

There never was any doubt that one day you would rise to be a leader of this great nation.

You have just assumed the presidency of a great nation whose future is under a dark cloud, a country full of potential but can not seem to make a single step forward.

Your predecessor, President Robert Mugabe, resigned in a manner that is not befitting of his contribution to the nation and you unexpectedly found yourself in an office that you did not seek, confronted with problems that you and your predecessor created.

The greatest of these problems was your predecessor’s iron fist rule and hate speech yet you have always bragged that he nurtured you to be a shrewd politician that you are today.

We forgive your past as we choose to focus on the future.

There is a lot of uncertainty among the millions of Zimbabweans on whether you will continue being in Mugabe’s shadow and adopt to his way of ruling or you will be courageous enough to step out and be your own man.

I trust that you will also make it the mission of your Presidency to assure the nation that ALL IS WELL and  to combat the scourge of poverty and disease everywhere.

But Mr President, there are some things that we must never emulate even from the people we owe a great respect to.

So here are a few ways you might begin to gain the respect of those who oppose you, yes there are lot of them who dont believe in you for one reason or the other.

Your first task should be to assure the millions of unemployed Zimbabweans that, one day, in the not so distant future, they will find themselves employed.

You need to let the nation know how you will make Zimbabwe an investor friendly nation that is open to Foreign Direct Investment (FDI).

Zimbabwe had become isolated, there hasn’t been any meaningful progress in the past 20

I encourage you to not only consider the economic and political environment, but also to pay serious attention to the will of your people.

You must work to enact sweeping reforms to enforce transparency and corporate governance to ensure that Zimbabwe’s perceptions of corruption change and corruption are actually being stamped out

Corruption is, of course, damaging to governments and the democratic process. But it’s also significantly corrosive to business, where the ability for individuals and companies to start, invest, and sell  with confidence  is at the very core of successful entrepreneurial cultures.

Use and cite the Constitution

If that constitutional oath (“preserve, protect and defend”) is the central duty of your job description, then I assume we will be hearing often from you about exactly how you are doing just that.

There is no replacement for strict adherence, application and defense of the Constitution. And it’s high time that presidents quit reciting the presidential oath tritely and then abandoning its tenets when they enter the Munhumutapa and State House Offices.

You should be quoting from the Constitution publicly as often as a preacher quotes the Bible to his congregation at least weekly.

The Zimbabwean public and the government have lost their grip on the content and role of the Constitution, but if you daily choose, you can help to re-educate and model its usage for them.

Protect Zimbabwean life.

Thomas Jefferson wrote in 1809, “The care of human life and happiness, and not their destruction, is the first and only legitimate object of good government.”

Those are powerful and enlightening words.

The commitment to protect life should serve as the basis for all you do, even as a foundation for your national defense strategy.  Don’t allow your pride, partisanship, personal bias or political abilities to jeopardize the safety of Zimbabwean lives. As commander in chief, you are called to preserve the loves of Zimbabweans.

We will be watching who you choose to be in your Cabinet.

I wish you strength and fortitude in the challenging days and years that lie ahead.

I’m sure you will ultimately achieve your dream making Zimbabwe a full partner in a community of nations committed to peace and prosperity for all.

Cheers to a new era!

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