Manlukerz Drops “January Diseases” Cure

Sweden based singer Manlukerz is set to drop a new album titled “Ndundu- Madhaiza” in a move he says is to cure the famous January Disease.

“I decided to drop the album early in the year because most of the people barely go out in January, therefore, they will have more time to sit and listen to the album along with the family.”

The album mostly focuses on reflecting upon the old indigenous ways of our culture.

“Tradition should always be respected and passed on along generations in the same way that our ancestors did. This is a flashback identity album,” he said.

“Flashback Identity” is a book which Manlukerz published in Swedish and now being translated into English.

Manlukerz further explained that the idea behind his album was to help the new generation learn about Zimbabwe’s culture and to give people an opportunity to go back and reflect upon the beauty our traditional ways.

“I want people’s minds to go back and reflect upon the old fashioned traditional way of living

“I also want to educate and hand over what our fore fathers used to do a long time ago to the younger generation,

“They should learn and develop their new culture with aspects of our tradition still intact and this will strengthen the relationship between the adults and the younger generation,” he added.

“Ndundu-Madhaiza” promises to bring a fresh new feel to the idea of traditional culture oriented music.

“The rhythm has changed a bit, it now comprises of a mixture of beats including traditional, gospel, jukes and isthikisa.

In a bid to preserve the rich Shona culture, Swedish based cultural activist Luckson Chikutu has published a book titled “Flashback Identity”.

The book which was published in Swedish is now being translated into English.

Popularly known as Manlukerz in the entertainment industry, Chikutu says the book is a bridge between cultural and generational gap.

“After a long period of persistent writing and endless patience, finally came the result, a book titled Flashback Identity.

“The writing of the book has been a long journey with positive insights I received and a high ambition to write about my family’s history, the cultural heritage I learnt when I was growing up. The book also captures how music and dance are used to influence humanity in Zimbabwe,” said Manlukerz.

Manlukerz’s hope is that the book be used in schools to teach pupils about the rich cultural heritage of Zimbabwe.

“I really want the book to be used in schools. This is my small contribution to Zimbabwe,” he said.

The author is also a musician.

“My mother taught me how to sing, dance, and play traditional music instruments. She also taught me how to use both the instruments and the musical tones to express emotions and feelings.  The inspiration I got from my mother motivated me to spread my wings on to the traditional and contemporary music world,” he said.

Manlukerz has continued with his performances in Sweden. He frequently conducts workshops in schools on Zimbabwe’s traditional music.

He is also the founder of the annual Zimbabwe Music Festival Bira (Zimfebi)

Zimfeb, which was formed in April 2007 is now an annual event.

The festival’s objective is to bring people together through celebrating cultures from different parts of the world. It also aims to promote awareness through music.

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