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Harare City Council Addresses Hopely Water Crisis

Harare City Council has partnered with the Embassy of the Netherlands in digging trenches to set up a massive water pipe system worth Euros 300 000 for residents of Hopely settlement following a public outcry over the dire situation in the area.

Recently, this publication reported on the water crisis in the area where residents are fetching water from the nearby Granville cemetry.

Harare Mayor, Jacob Mafume while touring the area today said the project is set to benefit more than 65 000 households.

“This project is set to benefit more than 65 000 households and we expect it to be done by December. We understand boreholes have no waters and residents are facing real challenges to access water,” he said.

The Mayor called for more assistance from donors and interested parties to help where they can as more still needs to be done to provide safe water in Hopley.

“We want to thank partners who are making this project possible but we also call for more assistance so that people from this area can access safe water very soon,”

Situated along Chitungwiza Road, Hopley informal settlement is among several residential areas in and around Harare facing acute shortage of water forcing them to depend on pits near the graveyard as sources of water.

With no piped water or borehole to draw water, Hopley residents are now resorting to man-made holes known as “mufuku” to fetch water for domestic use.

In an interview with 263Chat, Peter Mutumwa who has been living in Hopley since 2008 said people are being forced to buy water from unscrupulous individuals since they have limited options.

“We buy 20litres of water for between $ZWL 10-20, depending on demand. It is pointless to ask the origins of the water because we are in need,”

“I have been here for more than 10 years now and im grateful for this initiative because i know it is going to help our cause,” said Mutumwa.

Hopely settlement is yet to be regularized despite having more than a decade in existence.

The water crisis has been particularly devastating for women who now have to spend most of their time, fetching water instead of attending to other chores with the majority of women in this area relying on vending and other menial jobs to supplement their families.

Access to clean water continues to pose headaches for local council despite concerted efforts it has been making to ensure that the problem is resolved.

Major cities like Harare and Chitungwiza have been facing serious water shortages in the past years which are being attributed to infrastructural challenges.

 

 

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